Magazine


Issue 36, November / December 2000


“Irony is a secret pleasure.” — Hal Crowther, “Dealer’s Choice”

A Painted House  by John Grisham, the finale. Essays by Frank Beacham and Marianne Gingher. Fiction Jean Ross Justice. Poetry by Claude Wilkinson and Ron Rash.

Other contributors include John T. Edge, Edward Larson, John Shelton Reed, Lauren Winner, Roy Blount Jr., Hal Crowther, and more.







SERIAL

A PAINTED HOUSE 
As the floodwaters rise around the Chandlers’ farm, Luke finally tells his secrets—and learns that his life is about to change irrevocably. Conclusion.
by John Grisham

FEATURE

CHARLIE'S PLACE 
The dangers of interracial dancing in the 1950s South Carolina.

by Frank Beacham

SHORT STORY

BURIED MONEY 
A twice-wed woman discovers the treasure hidden in her past.
by Jean Ross Justice


DEPARTMENTS

LOCAL FARE

MY HEROES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN GRILL COOKS 
The fascination of tough philosophers in aprons.
by John T. Edge

MEMOIR

HORSES AND BOYS
A girlhood spent in the saddle.
by Marianne Gingher

SOJOURNS

MONKEY BUSINESS 
The Scopes Trial Festival re-creates the carnival-like atmosphere of the trial of the century.
by Edward Larson

BOOK VIEWS

THE MAN FROM NEW ORLEANS 
New biographies of an artist who worked magic in his silver designs.
by John Shelton Reed

LOST CLASSICS

THE PATRIOT 
The historical novels of James Boyd are worthy books in a maligned genre.
by Bruce Allen

PERIODICALS

WHO CAN FIND A VIRTUOUS WOMAN 
The lost world of Southern Lady magazine.
by Lauren Winner

HISTORY

THE MYTH OF THE GREAT BEAR HUNT
What really happened during Theodore Roosevelt’s legendary weekend in Mississippi.
by Douglas Brinkley

FAMILY LIFE

GEORGIA ON HER MIND 
A grandmother in love with her memories of the South.
by Jewell Parker Rhodes

SOUTHERN MUSIC

WORLD GONE WRONG 
Frank Hutchison’s blues speak to the ages.
by Tom Piazza

COLUMNS

DEALER'S CHOICE 
by Hal Crowther

GONE OFF UP NORTH
by Roy Blount Jr.

POETRY

THE ENDURING NIGHT 
by Claude Wilkinson

POCKETKNIVES 
by Ron Rash


Cover photo by Marry Noble Ours. Courtesy of Hemphill Fine Arts