Magazine


Issue 41, Fall 2001

The Hidden South

“When Eudora Welty composed a story, she pinned the sheets of paper together! I have an image of her with pins bristling from her mouth as, like a dressmaker working from a paper pattern, she tacked her frill-free paragraphs together, patiently tailoring the prose to fit the oddly shaped reality.” — John Updike

John Updike, Bobbie Ann Mason, X.J. Kennedy, and others remember Eudora Welty. Essays by Paul Reyes, Donna Tartt, Jacob Levenson, and more. Fiction by John McManus. An interview with Barry Hannah.

Other contributors include Bill Belleville, Eric Ormsby, Hal Crowther, David Bottoms, and more.







 

Columns & Departments

 

Dealer’s Choice
A MAN OF THE WORLD
James Still (1906–2001)
by Hal Crowther

 

Local Fare
EAT MORE POSSUM?
by John T. Edge

 

Southern Gallery
BARRY HANNAH
One of the South’s most celebrated fiction writers discusses his technique and beliefs.

 

Wildlife
WHERE TINY DEER REIGN
by Bill Belleville

 

Family Life
THE PLACE OF SHAKESPEARE IN A HOUSE OF PAIN
by Eric Ormsby

 

Art Views
SPANISH GRANDEUR IN MISSISSIPPI
by Donna Tartt

 

Southern Music
THE OTHER MUSIC CITIES
by Alex Halberstadt

 

Gone Off Up North
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHIN'
by Roy Blount Jr.

 

Forum
REMEMBERING EUDORA WELTY (1909-2001)
John UpdikeBobbie Ann Mason, X.J. Kennedy, and others pay tribute

 

Southern Scenes
EUDORA WELTY
photograph by William Eggleston

 


 

Features

 

ON THE ROAD IN THIRD-WORLD ALABAMA
The AIDS epidemic has hit the rural South, and one man tries to help.
by Jacob Levenson


STRANGE FRUIT: THE DREAM OF ELMER MARTIN
A Baltimore wax museum documents—explicitly—the events that shaped African-American history.
by Paul Reyes

 

SAMUEL MOCKBEE’S VISION IN AN INVISIBLE WORLD
A “genius” award-winning architect builds postmodern homes for the poor.
by Raad Cawthon

 

FETCH
A young man wants the affection of his roommate.
a story by John McManus

 


 

Poetry

 

VIGILANCE
by David Bottoms

 

DOCUMENTARY
by James Applewhite

 


Cover: "Leland Juke" by Birney Imes (Leland, Mississippi, 1983)